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Dr. Tori Hudson, Portland, Oregon, Blog Healthline Blog

Category Archive for 'Prevention'

Most all of us are familiar with the concept that we need 10,000 steps per day to achieve health benefits. A recent study was done to investigate further the optimal number of steps daily, as well as intensity required for health benefits. This observational study was conducted in 16,700 women with a mean age of […]

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There are several reasons to recommend strength training to women, including postmenopausal women – weight management, prevent decline in muscle mass, bone density, and now hot flashes!! A new clinical trial suggests that it is effective for the hot flashes of perimenopause/menopause. When it comes to exercise, some studies suggest that exercise may help reduce […]

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A new study holds out some hope for families who already have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and the reduction in risk of ASD in a future child. Previous population studies have demonstrated that maternal prenatal vitamin intake, particularly folic acid, appears to reduce the risk of ASD by about 40%. This is […]

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This study was done looking at 200 Swedish women aged 38-60 who underwent cycling testing that measured cardiovascular fitness. They were followed for an average of 29 years. Using objective assessments and repeat neuropsycychiatric evaluations, 23% were diagnosed with dementia at a mean age of 80. Researchers compared women who had medium cardiovascular fitness at […]

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Bladder infections in otherwise healthy pre-menopausal and non-pregnant women tend to be uncomplicated and are classified as lower urinary tract infections (UTIs). UTIs are amongst the most common infections in women and Escherichia coli (E.coli) is the organism that is the most common, responsible for about 75-95% of uncomplicated UTIs. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX), aka co-trimoxazole, and […]

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It’s not surprising to me that the age of puberty in girls has been declining the last 15-20 years. Environmental causes have been a suspect, but the reasons have not been clearly understood. The problem with early puberty is this is associated with higher rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease, polycystic ovarian syndrome and even breast […]

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Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. The 5-year cure rate with conventional medicine has become quite good, but even so, at least 40,000 women die each year. While most of breast cancer has no known cause, there are some modifiable risk factors that include, alcohol intake, exercise, weight and breast density, […]

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The purpose of this meta-analysis was to try to get some clarity and to summarize the evidence, from prospective cohort studies regarding the association between coffee intake and breast cancer risk. The design was established to assess associations between amounts of decaffeinated and caffeinated coffee (from 0 to 7 cups of coffee per day) and […]

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